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Author Topic: Now what does the Department of Defense in 2,200 Playstation 3s?  (Read 8910 times)
chaos
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« on: November 30, 2009, 02:19:04 AM »
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Quite an interesting little purchase by the U.S. Department of Defense. To be honest, I actually thought they were joking when some people said the processing capabilities of the PS3 were capable of navigating a missile. Well, guess what! Apparently they actually do have some major power within them, and that is in the processors which evidently are the processors.


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Apparently the Department of Defense believes that PS3s are a better value when it comes to supercomputers than IBM products specifically designed for the purpose. Granted recent price drops probably didn't hurt in justifying a 2,200 console order either.

This isn't the first time that the DoD is using PS3 consoles for supercomputing. In fact, these 2,200 units are going to be added to an existing Linux cluster of 336 PS3s used by the United States Air Force. According to Justification Review Documents, the purchase is all about getting the best value out the DoD's budget:

    With respect to cell processors, a single 1U server configured with two 3.2GHz cell processors can cost up to $8K while two Sony PS3s cost approximately $600. Though a single 3.2 GHz cell processor can deliver over 200 GFLOPS, whereas the Sony PS3 configuration delivers approximately 150 GFLOPS, the approximately tenfold cost difference per GFLOP makes the Sony PS3 the only viable technology for HPC applications.
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Bowdlerize
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« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2009, 10:50:52 PM »
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I'm dubious at best, in 2002 I worked in Melbourne's Burrow of Meteorology wiring the cooling system for their super computer. It's 84 towers with 2 Pentium Itanium2's per tower linked with optic fiber. Now I don't doubt that $660,000 + maby $500,000 for software development is a very cheap super computer indeed. But linking them with cat6 is going to create huge bottlenecks and there are a lot of things that you just don't need in the PS3 that add to the cost eg. graphics card, hard drive & the casing.

About the missile guidance use, of course it has the capabilities, the Apollo missions few on less processing power than a Texas Instruments scientific calculator. The automatic transmission computer on my 1993 Mitsubishi would do that fine.

In short they maybe looking for other uses for a cheap mass produced CPU, but I don't think super computer is a practical use.
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fungus
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« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2010, 10:54:22 PM »
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they want the EXTREMELY cheap Cell processors, and they aren't the only ones. Hell, if I need to do complex calculations, I'd rather buy a bunch of PS3's instead of a $200,000 supercomputer. From what I understand the PS3's are all linked together through ethernet connections, combining the processors and putting out some raw-as-fuck computing power! Google has plenty of links to other places that are doing the same shit.
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Anarchy Nation - A forum for the twisted!
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2010, 10:54:22 PM »




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katzskillz
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« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2010, 11:39:49 AM »
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Is it true that hospitals used (maybe still do) PS3s for some of their medical electronics? Something down the line like that occurred a little after the PS3s release.
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fungus
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« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2010, 02:40:00 PM »
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i found a site that tell how to build your own, could be useful if you need a supercomputer and you wanna do it cheap :)

http://www.ps3cluster.umassd.edu/
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truthstriker
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2013, 12:25:27 PM »
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They could be trying to figure out what some one would be capable of doing with that set up and system and then create their own system to counter it, or they could just be doing a test.  It really just sounds like a way to get a super computer across borders without attracting attention.
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tickler32
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« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2013, 01:49:43 PM »
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That just goes to show that the video game industry is more important than what some people think.
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locvan
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« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2013, 06:30:29 PM »
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Is it true that hospitals used (maybe still do) PS3s for some of their medical electronics? Something down the line like that occurred a little after the PS3s release.
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